Mill Your Own Flour At Home With Your Mixer

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Kitchen Aid flour mill attachment

Who Will Mill The Grain Into Flour?  I Will!

Mill your own flour at home – it is easier than you think!    This handy attachment for a KitchenAid mixer is so fun to use and offers the ability to make fresh flour from grains that aren’t always easy to find.  Fresh-milled flour ensures that all the nutrients will be available and the flavor is at its finest.  And it’s really fun to do!

MockMill

Wolfgang Mock Invented the MockMill

This flour mill attachment is the very first product launched by the Wolfgang Mock, Inc. which is the American subsidiary of the German company that has been building home mills since the 1970’s.  They are rebranding to bring these mills to American cooks who want to have the ability to do “Just-in-Time” milling in their own kitchens.  Mockmills are compatible with a long list of mixers, so they will be removing the title “KitchenAid”  from the name of the product.

“Unlike the metal burr or cement-bonded composite stone attachments, Mockmill has a true ceramic-bonded corundum stone, which produces very fine flour and will not wear down in time.”

ceramic stone

Lots of Fun and I Love This Book!

I have to say that I am really excited to have this attachment for my mixer.  When MockMill offered to send it to me,  I thought, “Well, I’ll try it out, but I doubt this is something I’d really use.”   When it arrived I was so impressed with the quality, the beautiful design, and the ease of use.  MockMill was nice enough to send along a book about the history of milling, the reasons to mill flour at home, all the details of nutrition, different grains, and fascinating facts about flour that I had never thought about.   I’m excited to learn more and try different kinds of grains in my cooking now.

Flour Power

Easier Than I Expected!

When I first unpacked the MockMill,  I was so surprised that it is easy to use!  I expected to spend some time figuring it out,  but it only has a few parts that go together in a very intuitive way.  The instructions recommend that you grind some brown rice in the machine first (to be thrown away) before anything else, just to get any mineral residue off the new grinding stones.   Grinding that rice was really fun!  Just seeing that flour come pouring out of the grinder was thrilling.   I felt like a pioneer!

I couldn’t wait to drive to town to see what whole grains were available at my local health foods store.  I realized later that I could grind dried peas, lentils, or oats already in my own pantry  but it was fun to see what my local store had to offer.  I came home with some red wheat berries and some rye grain.  This morning I found a recipe for chocolate cookies that uses rye flour,  so I ground up my rye grain with the MockMill.  Fun!

Let’s Read “The Little Red Hen!”

You know who is going to love doing this?  Children!  They can pour the grain into the hopper and watch the flour come out into the bowl! (Just make sure that fingers don’t go near the hopper and the grinding stones.)   I can’t wait until my grandson is old enough to hear the story of The Little Red Hen!  “Who will grind the grain?”   “We will!”

The MockMill is adjustable from fine to coarse, and it’s very easy to just turn the rounded end of the attachment to change the coarseness of the flour.

MockMill

So Many Possibilities: Mill Your Own Flour!

 I’m especially excited to have this mill in my kitchen because it has been designed to grind all 7 types of grain (wheat, rye, oats, barley, corn, brown rice, millet and subtypes such as spelt), kamut, quinoa, amaranth, triticale, and dry legumes.  Dry spices can also be milled: pepper, coriander, cardamom, etc.  It’s important to note that nuts, oily seeds such as sesame, poppy seeds, or coffee beans should NOT be ground in the MockMill.

Special Offer Just For You!

MockMill is making a special offer to my readers who wish to purchase a MockMill for their own home.  They are offering some introductory sets, available through August 31, 2016,  including books, grains, and the wonderful MockMill.   There are two package options, and each set is $259,  but YOU can get a discount for $80 off of this price if you use  this discount code during the final payment stage:  mimiavocado

Here is the link to the special offer http://mockmill-summerpromotion.wolfgangmock.com which is being offered only to readers of bloggers who are part of this special promotion.   Don’t forget to use my code “mimiavocado” when you make your payment to get the $80 discount.  These mills will be available in stores, but this price and these packages are being offered NOW just for you.

Rye Grain

I think it’s magical to be able to turn this whole grain into fine flour,  knowing that all the nutrition of the whole grain is right there in the bowl and the flavor couldn’t be any fresher.

rye flour

Rye flour ground with the MockMill and sifted onto a plate

Disclosure:   I was given a MockMill to try in my home with the expectation that I would write a review on my blog and publicize the introductory offer to my readers.  All opinions are my own.  I would not recommend this if I didn’t like it.   If any of my readers buy one of the introductory packages and use the discount code “mimiavocado” to receive an $80 discount from the $259 price,  MockMill will send me $10.  There are contests for the bloggers who sell the most MockMills — and it would be very nice if my readers help me qualify for prizes,  but I’m not trying to do a hard sell here.   Just want you all to know about this great machine and give YOU a chance to get one at a great price. 

 

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7 Comments

  1. Oh, my — it’s been forever since I ground my own flour. Like … 1972 or 73. A friend had a grinder. That bread ( wholewheat) was the BEST… so sweet and good, without adding any honey or molasses. Now you’ve got me jonesing for it, Mimi…

  2. This is super cool. I would love to grind up cauliflower to use as a dough. Have you tried that yet?

    • I don’t think this mill will work for cauliflour — maybe a food processor would work? I saw some riced cauliflour all ready to go in a plastic bag at Trader Joe’s yesterday.

  3. Nicely done! I’m sure you have the respect of your followers!

    • Hi Paul, I made some banana bread with that rye flour and felt such pride that I had milled the flour myself! Will be sharing the recipe too. I just ordered another cookbook that explores various whole grains, and look forward to enjoying the MockMill and sharing the results with my readers. Thank you!

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